Charlene Teters
Jason S. Ordaz

Charlene Teters is an artist, activist and educator whose artwork challenges the stereotypical portrayals of American Indians in American popular culture. She holds multiple degrees, including a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Illinois, where her activism against the use of Native Americans as sports mascots first began. Teters is a member of the Spokane Nation and is the academic dean at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. WPSU’s Cheraine Stanford talked with her about her work. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Space Exploration

Jul 19, 2018
Essayist Sarah Khalida in front of the Atlas V rocket.
Sarah Khalida

I believe in space exploration

Bob Poole (right), one of the developers of the Patton Crossing project, spoke to the Township Supervisors at a public hearing in May.
Min Xian / WPSU

The Patton Township Board of Supervisors has approved the rezoning of the proposed Patton Crossing development project. Developers will now move forward to create a master plan.

Unanimously approved by the board, the 28-acre project was rezoned with a new mixed-use development zoning code. The code would allow a grocery store, a hotel and both commercial and residential buildings in Patton Crossing’s concept plan.

One of the developers, Bob Poole, said the next step is to create a more detailed master plan.

Penn State Frat Hazing Death Trial Scheduled For February

Jul 19, 2018
The Beta Theta Pi fraternity house where Penn State student Timothy Piazza was fatally injured in Feb. 2017.
Min Xian / WPSU

BELLEFONTE, Pa. (AP) — Members of a Penn State University fraternity charged in connection with the death of a pledge after a night of hazing and drinking are scheduled to go to trial early next year.

Centre County Judge Jonathan Grine set aside 20 days for the trial involving 21 members of the now-closed Beta Theta Pi fraternity, starting Feb. 6.

Defendants are accused of hazing, reckless endangerment and other offenses after the death last year of 19-year-old pledge Tim Piazza, of Lebanon, New Jersey.

Cathy Wanner sitting
Anne Danahy / WPSU

President Donald Trump stunned many people this week on the question of Russian meddling in U.S. elections. While he later clarified his remark, the conflicting statements are continuing to stir controversy. WPSU’s Anne Danahy spoke with Penn State professor Catherine Wanner, a professor of history, anthropology and religious studies at Penn State and an expert on Russian and Ukranian politics.

Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna (middle) hosted a town hall in Philipsburg Tuesday night to address opioid addiction in the area. Cathy Arbogast (left) and Karlene Shugars (right) gave presentations as well.
Min Xian / WPSU

Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna hosted a town hall in Philipsburg Tuesday night to address opioid addiction in the area. Cantorna and other presenters want to remove the stigma surrounding addiction and provide resources for help.

“Someone has asked, ‘How as a family member do I help someone to get help?’’ Cantorna read and answered questions on index cards near the end of the town hall.

He said it’s important to engage the community when it comes to combating the opioid crisis, because the issue often has ripple effects.

In Performance at Penn State is a monthly hour-long program showcasing performances from Penn State's School of Music. This month, hear a Quintet for Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon and Piano by Andre Caplet, from the 2016 season of Music at Penns Woods; and the Symphony No. 3 by Franz Schubert, played by the Penn State Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Gerardo Edelstein, in October of 2016. 

Brian Southwell is director of science in the public sphere at RTI International. We spoke with Southwell about communicating science, whether fact checking works and the idea behind his weekly radio show and podcast, “The Measure of Everyday Life.”  

WPSU Jazz Archive - July 13, 2018

Jul 13, 2018

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz Show as broadcast on July 13, 2018 and hosted by Greg Halpin. 

The first hour of the program features all new jazz releases from Geoffrey Keezer, J.D. Allen, John Christensen, The Bernardo Casa Grande Quintet, The Stanley Clarke Band, John Coltrane, and more. 

The second hour of the program features jazz classics from the 1950s and 60s, as well as more recent recordings from Azar Lawrence, Human Motion, Oliver Nelson, Lester Young, The Vince Guaraldi Trio, Twin Danger, Jessica Williams, The Steve Kuhn Trio, and more. 

Pam and Toby Short with the letter they brought to State Sen. Jake Corman asking him to help pass redistricting reform.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Redistricting advocates in Centre County are making a last-ditch effort to change how Pennsylvania’s Congressional districts are drawn.

It’s a week past an unofficial deadline to keep redistricting reform on track for 2021. That’s when maps will be redrawn.

But a group from “Fair Districts PA—Centre County” went to Senator Jake Corman’s office in Bellefonte on Thursday to urge him to keep working. The state constitution says the bill must be passed and advertised in newspapers by August 6.

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There was a conspicuous act of bravery in the second half of this week's World Cup championship game.

The French team, which won 4 to 2, was bold and deft. Many of their players are immigrants, or children of immigrants, from Africa. Their victory was also seen as a triumph over bigots in France, who have vilified and attacked immigrants.

The Croatian national team was dauntless. Several of their players were from families who were refugees when their country was torn by war.

A storm rolls in over the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. The clouds are low and dark as distant lightning cracks over a green prairie. Wade Running Crane is starting to get wet.

"This is like a sign from Ashley that she's here," he says of his family friend Ashley Loring.

Ashley's mother, Loxie Loring, is standing next to him.

"She liked this kind of weather," she says. Her daughter also loved riding horses and writing poetry.

"She was outgoing," Loring says. "She wasn't scared of anything, And for how small she is, she was..."

A Road Trip In 'America For Beginners'

1 hour ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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9 Of Those Killed In Duck Boat Capsizing Were Related

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET Seventeen people are dead after an amphibious tourist boat carrying 31 people capsized and sank Thursday during a severe squall in a lake in southern Missouri. The Ride the Ducks Branson boat sank on Table Rock Lake near the resort town of Branson on Thursday. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations. On Friday morning, the county sheriff told reporters that all the bodies had been found, bringing the death toll to 17. The Associated Press...

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Father Of 2 Parkland Shooting Survivors Is Killed In Robbery; Suspect Arrested

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Three years ago, the Democratic Socialists of America had about 6,000 members across the country--fewer than the American Racing Pigeon Union. Since then, DSA membership has shot up more than 600 percent. And Democratic Socialist candidates are popping up across the country. One of them, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is likely to land a seat in the House of Representatives this fall. Today on the show: How an ideology that was political poison for decades worked its way back into mainstream...

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Carne Asada, Hold The Meat: Why Latinos Are Embracing Vegan-Mexican Cuisine

Tall, dreadlocked Josh Scheper knew he was out of place as he surveyed the scene at a Santa Ana, Calif., parking lot on a Sunday morning this past April. And the 46-year-old loved it. Hundreds of people waited in line at stalls for vegan food, but few people looked like the Los Angeles resident. Nearly everyone in the crowd was young and Latino, as were the chefs. The food on sale was Mexican — but not hippie-dippy cafe standbys like cauliflower tacos, or tempeh-stuffed burritos. Instead,...

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Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home

In May, Lourdes walked across the bridge from Mexico to El Paso, Texas, and requested asylum. The first step is an interview with an asylum officer. "I told him that I have the evidence on me," Lourdes said, through an interpreter. She told the asylum officer about the scar on her arm, and the four missing fingers on her left hand — all evidence, she says, of a brutal attack by a gang in her native Honduras. But the asylum officer rejected her claim. "I don't know what happened," Lourdes said...

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Starbucks To Open First 'Signing Store' In The U.S. To Serve Deaf Customers

Ordering a "grande four-pump, nonfat, no-whip, extra-hot mocha" is a mouthful for any hot beverage nerd, but for deaf people, it can be hard to order just a simple cup of black coffee. Global coffee behemoth Starbucks' "Signing Store Project," launching in Washington, D.C. in October, aims to change that. Adam Novsam, a deaf utility analyst at Starbucks headquarters in Seattle, knows firsthand how frustrating it can be to accomplish even the most basic transactions in the hearing world. ...

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The Internet's 'Hive Mind' Is A Soundtrack To The Slow Burn Of Summer

When The Internet first debuted in 2011, the common joke was that the musicians had picked an unfortunate name for fans who wanted to find anything about them on, you know, the Internet. But those cheap snickers quickly faded as the group's sly, slick funk sensibility took hold, even for search engines. Seriously, Google them. In recent years, the band members have each embarked on solo projects , sparking fears The Internet had shut down. Now, the band is back and with a new release called...

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Summer Latin Music Festivals Offer Music And Opportunity

This year we mark our annual summer Latin music festival show with an accompanying deeper dive into the reason some of these festivals exist: lack of inclusion on the big summer festival stages. Listen to the podcast and read how the Latinx community is dealing with representation in the music industry. This week features Alt.Latino contributors Marisa Arbona Ruiz , Catalina Maria Johnson , Rocio Santos and Gabriela Sierra Alonso There is a growing musical movement underway, fueled by the...

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Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

With less than four months to go, how much are this year's midterm elections at risk for the kind of interference sowed by Russia in 2016? It's a question that's coming up again after President Trump's seemingly shifting positions this week about Russia's responsibility for the interference in 2016, and after special counsel Robert Mueller's recent indictments of 12 Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking the Democratic Party and state election computer networks. It would be "foolish...

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Debut Novelist Enters Mind Of Aging Man To Explore Grief And Life's Meaning

In her poignant new book The Dependents , debut novelist Katharine Dion adeptly and often poetically explores serious topics like grief, friendship and how to know whether ones life has had meaning. Here & Now s Robin Young talks with Dion about the book, which makes for a memorable summer read thanks to its quirky characters, interesting relationships and expressive writing. Book Excerpt: The Dependents by Katharine Dion His wife had died in June and there was to be a memorial service for...

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Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures

Each spring, barnacle geese migrate more than 1,800 miles from the Netherlands and northern Germany to their breeding grounds in parts of Russia above the Arctic Circle. The journey north usually takes about a month, and the geese make multiple stops along the way to eat and fatten up before they lay their eggs, says Bart Nolet of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and the University of Amsterdam. But that pattern of migration is changing, as rapidly rising temperatures have led to earlier...

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The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

Get your NPR News Fix This Weekend!

Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

It's Folk Season

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again.

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Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

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Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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